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HCV Disease Progression

AASLD 2017: Curing Hepatitis C with DAAs Reduces Liver Cancer Risk

People who achieved a sustained virological response to hepatitis C treatment lowered their risk of hepatocellular carcinoma by around 70%, regardless of whether they were treated with new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) or older interferon-based therapy, according to study results presented at the 2017 AASLD Liver Meeting last week in Washington, DC.

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EASL 2017: Hepatitis C Treatment Allows 1 in 4 to Come Off Liver Transplant Waiting List

Around a quarter of people with hepatitis C and decompensated cirrhosis came off liver transplant waiting lists in Europe after direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment, and very few had any subsequent liver-related problems during 15 months of follow-up, Luca Belli reported on behalf of the ELITA study investigators at the EASL International Liver Congress last month in Amsterdam.

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CROI 2017: Are HIV/HCV Coinfected People Cured with DAAs at Increased Risk for Liver Cancer?

HIV/HCV coinfected people who are successfully treated for hepatitis C using interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy do not appear to have an increased likelihood of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this month in Seattle.

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EASL 2017: Direct-Acting Antivirals for Hepatitis C Not Linked to Higher Liver Cancer Risk

Hepatitis C patients treated with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) do not appear to have a higher risk of developing liver cancer compared to those treated with interferon, and the seemingly higher rates seen in some studies are attributable to risk factors such as older age and more advanced liver disease, according to a set of studies presented at the EASL International Liver Congress this week in Amsterdam.

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AASLD 2016: Is DAA Treatment for Hepatitis C Reducing the Need for Liver Transplants?

Patients successfully treated for hepatitis are less likely to need liver transplants and less likely to die while on a transplant waiting list, according to studies presented at the recent AASLD Liver Meeting. A related analysis looked at the optimal timing of treatment for people awaiting transplants in order to avoid "MELD purgatory."

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