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AASLD 2016: Real-World Responses to HCV Treatment Among U.S. Veterans Match Best Clinical Trial Results

Direct-acting antiviral treatment is curing people of hepatitis C in real-world clinical practice at similar rates to those seen in clinical trials, and there do not seem to be major differences between drug regimens, according to results of a large population study presented this weekend at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in Boston.

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AASLD 2016: Liver Cancer Risk Reduced After Hepatitis C Treatment, But Vigilance Needed

People who are cured of hepatitis C after a course of direct-acting antiviral treatment do not have a higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) -- and probably have a reduced risk -- according to studies from Italy and Canada presented at American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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Coverage of IDWeek 2016

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2016, held October 26-30 in New Orleans.

Conference highlights include experimental HIV therapies, PrEP and other biomedical HIV prevention, antibiotic resistance, and emerging infectious diseases such as Ebola virus and Zika virus.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek website

11/4/16

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IDWeek 2016: New Triple DAA Combo Cures 96%-99% of People with Genotype 1-6 Hepatitis C

A new 3-drug regimen of sofosbuvir, velpatasvir, and voxilaprevir, taken without ribavirin for 8 weeks, produced sustained virological response in 96% of previously untreated patients with all hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes, while a 12-week course cured 99% of treatment-experienced patients, researchers reported at the recent IDWeek meeting in New Orleans. Response rates dropped off, however, when treatment was shortened to 6 weeks.

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HIV Glasgow: Generic Hepatitis C Drugs Purchased Online Produce High Cure Rates

Use of generic versions of direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C resulted in very high cure rates for people who obtained the products through 3 buyers’ clubs, indicating that the generic products are effective, according to a set of poster presentations at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV Glasgow) last week. People who purchased generic drugs were cured at a cost of around US$700-$900 in Southeast Asia and Eastern Europe, Andrew Hill of St. Stephen’s AIDS Trust reported.

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