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DDW 2014: Some Negative Predictive Factors Do Not Impair Response to Faldaprevir

Some factors traditionally associated with poorer response to interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C played little role in clinical trials of the HCV protease inhibitor faldaprevir, according to several studies presented at Digestive Disease Week this month in Chicago. HCV subtype 1a and prior treatment did not significantly worsen response, while HIV/HCV coinfection may be associated with better response.

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DDW 2014: Sustained Response to Interferon Is Durable in Children with Hepatitis C

Children with hepatitis C treated with interferon-based therapy continued to show undetectable HCV viral load up to 7 years after achieving sustained virological response in the PEDS-C trial, researchers reported at Digestive Disease Week this month in Chicago.

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Janssen Seeks Approval of Simeprevir + Sofosbuvir for HCV Genotype 1

Janssen Research & Development has submitted a supplemental New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requesting approval of its HCV protease inhibitor simeprevir (Olysio) for use with Gilead Sciences' HCV polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) for certain treatment-naive and previously treated genotype 1 hepatitis C patients.

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DDW 2014: AbbVie Interferon-free Regimen Cures More than 90% of Hepatitis C Patients

AbbVie's all-oral "3D" regimen containing ABT-450, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir, used with or without ribavirin, led to sustained virological response in 90% to 100% of genotype 1a and 1b hepatitis C patients in the Phase 3 PEARL trials, according to data reported at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2014) meeting last week in Chicago and in the May 4 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CROI 2014 & EASL 2014: Treating Hepatitis B and C in HIV+ People Reduces Liver Disease

Effective antiviral treatment that suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) repliaction or eradicates hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lower the risk of developing advanced liver disease including cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensation in people with HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection, according to studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) and EASL International Liver Congress.

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