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EASL 2014: Researchers Look at Treatment as Prevention for Hepatitis C

Widespread hepatitis C treatment with effective new direct-acting antivirals could dramatically reduce hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission, but making this work on a large scale will require efforts to scale up HCV screening and bring down drug costs, according to several presentations at the EASL International Liver Congress this month in London.

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EASL 2014: Sofosbuvir Works Well Despite Multiple Negative Predictive Factors

Hepatitis C treatment using sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) is highly effective even for people with multiple factors traditionally associated with poor response. Having 4 or more negative predictive factors, however, raises the risk of post-treatment relapse, according to a report at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress held recently in London.alt

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EASL 2014: Sofosbuvir + GS-5816 NS5A Inhibitor Is Effective Against HCV Genotypes 1-6

A new experimental NS5A inhibitor, GS-5816, was shown to be safe and effective when used in an interferon- and ribavirin-free dual regimen with sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) for people with hepatitis C genotypes 1 through 6, according to Phase 2 results presented at the 49thEASL International Liver Congress last week in London.

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AbbVie Combination Safe and Highly Effective in Patients with Post-Transplant HCV Recurrence

A 3-drug combination of direct-acting antivirals developed by AbbVie cured hepatitis C genotype 1 infection in 96% of transplant recipients with recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a small Phase 2 study reported last week at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2014) in London.

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EASL 2014: MK-5172 + MK-8742 Demonstrate Good Early Post-Treatment Response Rates

A combination of 2 direct-acting antivirals, MK-5172 and MK-8742, with or without ribavirin, led to early post-treatment sustained response rates above 90% for genotype 1 hepatitis C patients, including people with cirrhosis or HIV/HCV coinfection, according to a series of presentations last week at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress in London.

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