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EASL 2016: Vaccines for HIV and Hepatitis C Could Potentially Be Administered Together

Immunization against HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) could potentially be combined without compromising immune response to either, though effective vaccines for both diseases are still elusive, according to research presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) last week in Barcelona.

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EASL 2016: Adolescents with Hepatitis C Achieve High Cure Rates with Sofosbuvir/Ledipasvir

Sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) was well-tolerated and led to sustained virological response in 97% of adolescents (age 12-17) with chronic hepatitis C, with high cure rates regardless of prior treatment experience or presence of liver cirrhosis, according to a report presented at the 2016 EASL International Liver Congress in Barcelona.

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EASL 2016: Novel Therapy RG-101 Plus Antivirals Could Cure Hepatitis C in 4 Weeks

Two injections of RG-101, an experimental drug that targets the micro RNA miR-122 in liver cells, combined with direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) taken for just 4 weeks led to 12-week post-treatment sustained response in 97% of chronic hepatitis C patients, according to study results presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) last week in Barcelona.

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Coverage of the 2016 EASL International Liver Congress

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) in Barcelona, April 13-17, 2016.

Conference highlights include interferon-free hepatitis C treatment for people with advanced disease, experimental HCV therapy, new treatment for hepatitis B, and management of liver disease complications.

Full listing by topic

International Liver Congress website

4/22/16

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EASL 2016: Shifting Hepatitis C Treatment to Primary Care Providers Could Expand Availability

Hepatitis C treatment managed by non-specialists such as primary care physicians and nurse practitioners is as safe and effective as treatment delivered by specialists -- even for challenging patient groups -- and could help increase the number of people receiving therapy, according to findings from the ASCEND study presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) this week in Barcelona.

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