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DDW 2016: Modern DAA Regimens Cost Less Per Cure than Older Hepatitis C Treatments

The cost of treating chronic hepatitis C with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) with or without ribavirin is lower than the cost of prior interferon-based therapy with first-generation direct-acting antivirals, in part because the newer regimen is well-tolerated and requires less management of side effects, according to a Kaiser Permanente study presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016 last month in San Diego.

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EASL 2016: Grazoprevir/ Elbasvir Superior to Sofosbuvir Plus Pegylated Interferon

New research has demonstrated the clear superiority of an oral combination of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) over a regimen that combines a DAA with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Results from the C-EDGE Head-to-Head study were presented at the recent EASL International Liver Congress in Barcelona.

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DDW 2016: Sofosbuvir/ Velpatasvir Produces High Hepatitis C Cure Rates in ASTRAL Trials

A coformulation of Gilead Science's sofosbuvir and its investigational hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A inhibitor velpatasvir taken for 12 weeks produced sustained virological response in 95% to 99% of participants across HCV genotypes and led to improvements in patient-reported outcomes, according to a pair of studies presented at the 2016 Digestive Disease Week meeting this week in San Diego.

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DDW 2016: ABT-493 + ABT-530 Cures Most Hepatitis C Patients in SURVEYOR Studies

A coformulation of AbbVie's experimental next-generation direct-acting antiviral agents ABT-493 and ABT-530 was well-tolerated and led to sustained virological response in 97% or more of patients with all hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in a set of studies reported this week at the 2016 Digestive Disease Week meeting in San Diego.

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EASL 2016: WHO Issues New Hepatitis C Guidelines, EASL Guidelines Update Coming

In April, coinciding with the International Liver Congress in Barcelona, the World Health Organization (WHO) released an update to its Guidelines for the Screening, Care and Treatment of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection. The guidelines promote the transition to newer, more effective direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medications that have the potential to cure most people living with hepatitis C. Also during the meeting the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) announced it would update its hepatitis C treatment guidelines at a special conference in September.

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