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IAS 2015: Gay Men Are Using Nuanced Sero-adaptive Behaviors to Prevent HIV Infection

There is evidence that some groups of Australian and American gay men are considering HIV-positive partners’ undetectable viral load and the time elapsed since an HIV-negative partner last tested when making decisions about using condoms, according to studies presented at the recent 8th International AIDS Society Conference in Vancouver.

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BHIVA 2015: HIV+ Men on Antiretroviral Treatment Have Undetectable Rectal Viral Load

A small study assessing the infectiousness of HIV-positive gay men taking antiretroviral therapy has found that all study participants had an undetectable viral load in the rectum, according to a presentation at the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference last week in Brighton. Men who had rectal gonhorrea or chlamydia did not have detectable virus either, suggesting that concerns about sexually transmitted infections raising the risk of HIV transmission may be unfounded when people are taking effective HIV treatment.

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Gay Men Better at Predicting When They Won't Have Sex than When They Will

A study in which a group of HIV negative gay and bisexual men from New York City were asked to predict each day whether they would have sex the following day, and then compared their prediction with what actually happened, found that men generally overestimated the likelihood they would have sex. This study, published in the April 1 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, suggests possible pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) dosing strategies.

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CROI 2015: PEPFAR Abstinence and Faithfulness Funding Had No Impact on Sexual Behavior in Africa

Nearly $1.3 billion spent on U.S.-funded programs to promote abstinence and faithfulness had no significant impact on sexual behavior in 14 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, an analysis of sexual behavior data has shown. The preliminary findings were presented by Nathan Lo of Stanford University School of Medicine at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Meta-Analysis Shows Injectable Hormonal Contraception Linked to HIV Infection Risk

Women who use the long-acting injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera had a modest but significant increase in the risk of contracting HIV infection, according to a meta-analysis of 12 studies published in the January 8Lancet Infectious Diseases. However, there was no increase in risk for women using birth control pills.

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