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AIDS 2014: Circumcised Men and Female Partners Have Lower Syphilis Rates

A study presented today at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne found positive associations between voluntary medical male circumcision and reduced incidence of syphilis, not just among men, but also among their female partners. Another study found no evidence of risk compensation among men post-circumcision, while a third used a novel food-voucher scheme as an incentive for getting older men to come forward for circumcision.

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AIDS 2014: Disappointing HIV Cure News Leads to New Questions

The fourth IAS Towards an HIV Cure symposium -- an initiative of the International AIDS Society -- took place July 19-20, prior to the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne.

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AIDS 2014: Researchers Discuss Progress Towards an HIV Cure [VIDEO]

Progress along the multi-pronged path towards a cure for HIV was one of the themes at the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), taking place this week in Melbourne. Researchers provided updates on the "Mississippi Baby," a novel assay for detecting low levels of hidden virus in the body, and using the anti-cancer drug romidepsin to reactivate latent virus.

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AIDS 2014: Adult Male Circumcision Also Protects Women from HIV Infection [VIDEO]

Voluntary medical male circumcision -- which has been shown to reduce the risk of men acquiring HIV by around 50% -- also offers protection for their female partners, according to study findings presented Friday at the 20th International AIDS Conference taking place this week in Melbourne.

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CROI 2014: Women with Circumcised Partners Less Likely to Have HIV

A study from Orange Farm near Johannesburg in South Africa -- the area that hosted the first-ever randomized controlled trial of male circumcision for HIV prevention, which concluded in 2005 -- has found evidence that women who are partners of circumcised men are less likely to have HIV themselves, according to a presentation at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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