Back HIV Treatment When to Start ART

When to Start ART?

Short Antiretroviral Therapy Beneficial during Primary HIV Infection

A short course of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) started during primary HIV infection is associated with CD4 T-cell gains and viral load reductions after treatment is stopped, according to a meta-analysis published in the December 6 edition of PLoS ONE.

alt

Read more:

Increased Risk of AIDS-defining Illnesses Seen Even at CD4 Counts of 500-750

HIV positive people with CD4 T-cell counts in the 500-749 cells/mm3 range still have a higher risk of AIDS-defining illnesses -- especially cancers -- compared to those with more than 1000 cells/mm3, although the risk is quite low, according to a study published in the August 6, 2013, advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. These findings offer further evidence of the benefits of prompt antiretroviral treatment.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2013: Intensive ART During Primary HIV Infection Lowers Viral Reservoir

Starting intensive antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a 5-drug regimen during the earliest stages of HIV infection can result in lower levels of virus in resting T-cell reservoirs, leading to improved immune function and potentially a better chance at a functional cure, according to studies presented at the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this month in Kuala Lumpur.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2013: Meta-analysis Finds Early HIV Treatment Reduces Risk of AIDS and Death

A meta-analysis of more than 30 studies found that starting antiretroviral therapy with a CD4 T-cell count above 350 cell/mm3 was associated with a lower risk of progression to AIDS or death, according to a poster presented at the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this month in Kuala Lumpur.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2013: Conference Opens with Focus on Aging, Global Guidelines, Drug Users

The 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) kicked off Sunday in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Highlights of the first day included the release of new World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral therapy guidelines, a high-level panel on drug policy and public health, and a keynote address on HIV and aging.

alt

Read more: